Collab Social in Bolingbrook!

Collab Social in Bolingbrook!

Event Description: We are bringing our annual Collab Social to Bolingbrook! Come learn about the Collab and what we offer as we grow our community stakeholder network beyond Chicago! Join us for a light info session and networking at Fountaindale Public Library to chat accessibility-related topics with passionate members of the accessibility community… all with a focus on the small changes we are making at our organizations to incrementally make a big impact for cultural spaces and visitors with disabilities! Snacks, including vegetarian and gluten-free offerings, and light refreshments provided.

Event Date: Wednesday, April 24

Event Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. CST

Location: Meeting Room A, Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W Briarcliff Rd., Bolingbrook, IL 60440

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided for the welcome address. Networking will follow. Please clearly indicate any additional access requests via the event registration form at least 3 business days in advance of the event. You can also call or text 773-203-5039 to discuss specific requests.

Suggested Donation: While our programs are free, a $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online at any time! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Registration: Join us by completing this event registration form! Note that registrations will close on April 23 at 11:55 p.m. CST. In case of technical difficulties, please email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org for assistance.

Elevating Artists with Disabilities

Event Description:  What opportunities exist (or could be created) for artists with disabilities to showcase our work, highlight what we do, share our perspective, and find connections and communities? What makes a cultural space more effective and inclusive when working with disabled artists? Join us for a conversation-driven Lunch & Learn where artists and cultural administrators share experiences and hopes for inclusive curation practices, accessible spaces, artist support, and sustainability through small breakout groups. Audience participation is highly encouraged as we share ideas and innovate on breaking down barriers!

Event Date: Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Event Time: 11:30 AM to 1 PM Central Time

Who Should Attend: Artists and cultural administrators who want to connect and converse.

Location: Zoom. Once you register, you will have the option to add this event to your calendar. You will then receive a Zoom Meeting link from info@culturalaccesscollab.org no later than 24 hours before the event, as well as 1 hour prior to start time. Please be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Program Accessibility: ASL interpretation and Real-Time captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided for the webinar portion of the program. Breakout rooms will have live Zoom captioning with ASL interpreters available on an as needed basis. Please clearly indicate access needs via the event registration form so we can properly support your participation! You can also call or text 773-203-5039 to discuss specific requests.

Suggested Donation: While our programs are free, a $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online at any time! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Registration: Join us by completing this event registration form! Note that registrations will close on March 19 at 12 o’clock noon. In case of technical difficulties, please email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org for assistance.

Service Dogs Welcome

Event Description: Join our panel of service dog users and legal experts in a safe space to answer your questions on guide dogs, hearing dogs, medical alert dogs, and more! Learn the responsibilities of cultural institutions in shaping policies for service animal handlers, interacting correctly with support animals and creating a sense of cultural inclusivity and safety. Examine how to create a welcoming environment for all visitors, including their working companions. 

Event Date: Thursday, February 1, 2024.

Event Time: 3:00 PM to 4:15 PM Central Time

Who Should Attend: Audience facing staff at your organization, or anyone interested or involved in guest relations.

Location: Zoom. Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email 24 hours prior to the event. Please be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration form or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services.

Suggested Donation: While our programs are free, a $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online at any time! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Registration: Join us by completing this event registration form! Note that registrations will close on January 31 at 11:55 PM. In case of technical difficulties, please email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org for assistance.


Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Accessible Equipment Loan Open House

Event Description: Hosting inclusive and accessible experiences often requires equipment and resources. Has your organization thought about offering an accessible performance, tour, or lecture, but you’re just not confident about the equipment or steps needed? Did you know that the Collab rents out equipment to support cultural organizations’ accessible offerings at no cost to renters? 

Come check out the offerings of the Cultural Access Collab’s Accessible Equipment Loan Program in real life at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, and discover for yourself in this interactive, exploratory open house session! Whether you’re a frequent borrower or you’re just curious to learn more, this casual setting will encourage you to ask questions, network and engage with service providers and community members alike!

Bonus: We have some updated resources for the Collab community that we can’t wait to highlight at this open house! 

Date: Tuesday, December 19, 2023

Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Location: Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 2430 N Cannon Dr, Chicago, IL 60614

Cost: FREE, $5 suggested donation


Facilitators

Graphic showing photos of our four Open House facilitators, alongside text that reads, "Meet Access Providers! Ask Questions!" Clockwise from left to right: Hudson is a young man in his late twenties with short red-hair, a freckled face, and deep set blue eyes. He wears a big smile, a dark blue collared shirt and a black wool blazer. Jo is a white woman of a certain age, with short gray hair and glasses, wearing a purple fleece top, and standing in front of rust-colored curtains. Eddie is a light-skinned man with dark hair and a full beard. He wears a grey flannel shirt and poses in front of a lattice room divider with green plants in the background. Matt is a white man with blue eyes and combed back brown hair. He poses outside in a black button down shirt.
Clockwise from left to right: Hudson Therriault, audio describer. Jo Gayle, CART captioner. Eddie Medrano, event producer. Matt Bivins, CaptionPoint.

These four wonderful folks will be there to answer your questions!

Hudson Therriault is a full-time audio describer based in Chicago. His first experience with audio description was a regional theater tour in Montana, and he has since trained with seasoned audio description professionals. He is passionate about building access for all into the foundation of artistic expression. HJTdescriptions.crd.co

Jo Gayle has been a CART captioner for almost 20 years, providing CART services for such local organizations as Cultural Access Collaborative, Chicago Humanities Festival, Chicago Hearing Society, and WBEZ, as well as for students at most of the colleges and universities in the area, and such national organizations as the Hearing Loss Association of American (HLAA), Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA), and World Institute on Disability (WID). “I live in Chicago, and I would be happy to discuss ways to make your events more inclusive for people with hearing loss who do not use ASL.”

Eddie Medrano got his start in the events industry over 15 years ago. After cutting his teeth working at various music venues, he eventually made his way into the non profit sector. He is currently the Senior Event Producer at Chicago Public Media.

Matt Bivins is a “recovering actor” who created CaptionPoint alongside his wife Lindsay, who is profoundly deaf. Their goal was to enable Lindsay to fully experience Chicago’s vibrant Storefront Theater scene alongside Matt. Now, six years later, this passion project, driven by a do-it-yourself ethos, has successfully provided captions for a wide range of live theater performances throughout the entire country.

Hudson, Jo, Eddie, and Matt will be demonstrating various accessible services in action with equipment from Cultural Access Collaborative’s loan program. 


Additional Details

Program Format: There will be no formal address or presentation for this program. Registrants can freely explore various ‘demo stations’ that showcase our accessible equipment, including: a CART captioning station; an audio description station; an assistive listening station; and a resource table highlighting our new handbook and borrowing process. Each area will be staffed by Collab representatives and access providers who can answer your questions and facilitate hands-on opportunities with the equipment and resources.

Accessibility: ASL Interpretation and Assistive Listening devices are available by request. Indicate your access needs during the registration process, and we will coordinate coverage given at least 3 business days notice. Please inform us of any additional requests that would enable you to participate. You may also reach us at 773-203-5039 to request services.

COVID Policy: Masks are strongly encouraged when not actively eating or drinking.

Parking: Please be advised that parking may be extremely limited in the area due to Lincoln Park ZooLights. We recommend you arrive early to allow plenty of time to find parking; or, consider carpooling, using public transit, or catching an Uber/Lyft.

Free parking is available on Cannon and Stockton Drive. A flat-rate lot maintained by the Chicago Park District is located at 2431 N. Cannon Drive. Learn more about lot rates.

A limited number of wheelchair accessible parking spots are located near the front entrance on Cannon Drive.

Public Transit: The Nature Museum is accessible by CTA bus routes #76, #151, and #156.

Uber/Lyft: If you using a rideshare service, inform your driver that the bus turnaround near the front entrance may be used for drop off.

Entry: All guests should enter through the front entrance located on Cannon Drive. The entrance is wheelchair accessible and is equipped with activation push buttons. Our program is located on the second floor, via a passenger elevator that is wheelchair, walker, and stroller accessible. All restrooms on all levels are stroller and wheelchair accessible. All-gender restrooms are available for anyone who prefers a single-occupancy restroom. Service animals are welcome.

Registration: Please register at https://tinyurl.com/55kv4a8s

Suggested Donation: While most programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.


Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Cultural Access Collab’s 10th Anniversary Celebration & Fundraiser

Celebrate a decade of access.
Join Us!

Cultural Access Collaborative’s
10th Anniversary Celebration
and Fundraiser


Monday, October 30, 2023
5-7pm

Plante Moran
1st Floor Lobby
10 South Riverside Plaza
Chicago IL

Entrance on the corner of Monroe and Canal

$50 per attendee 


Cultural Access Collab removes barriers to make Illinois’ arts and culture more accessible to people with disabilities by providing education, promotional tools, accessible equipment and a supportive community. Join us in celebrating the past ten years of our work, and help us make Illinois even more inclusive in the year to come! 

Enjoy music performed by the Tommy Carroll Trio, light refreshments and drinks, all while helping to sustain our cultural accessibility efforts in Illinois. If you’re able, make an additional donation to further support the Collab’s efforts.

About Tommy Carroll Trio
The Tommy Carroll Trio is an ensemble offering highly rhythmic interpretations of jazz compositions old and new. Composed of drums, bass and guitar, the group’s adventurous spirit provides listeners a fresh experience at every performance

Your $50 Ticket Includes
Light appetizers and two beverage tickets (beer, wine, or non-alcoholic) are provided per ticket. You will also be automatically entered to win one of our exciting door prizes!

Dress code is business casual.

Online registration closes at 11:59 PM on the Sunday evening prior to Monday’s celebration. If you miss the online registration period, no worries! You can show up at the door and make payment at the check-in table.

Covid Safety
As COVID-19 continues to impact our communities — and because there will be immunocompromised and medically vulnerable people in attendance — we need your help to create and maintain a safer environment for all. It is our collective responsibility to follow this guidance and we appreciate your cooperation in advance.

Masking is highly recommended when not actively eating or drinking. Clear masks will be available if needed. Weather permitting, there is outdoor access at the venue. We will monitor Covid rates in our area, and may revise our policy if appropriate.

If you test positive for COVID-19 within 4 days following the event, please notify info@CulturalAccessCollab.org and let us know. We will inform all attendees.

Accessibility Information
Everyone is welcome!

  • Plante Moran is accessible to guests who use wheelchairs or need to avoid stairs. Tables and chairs are available. 
  • American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and open captioning is available for the brief remarks portion of the evening; if you require ASL or captioning for mingling with other guests, please let us know in advance.
  • A quiet room is available.
  • A limited number of complimentary tickets are available to those who wish to attend, but cannot afford the ticket price. Email us at info@CulturalAccessCollab.org to learn more.
  • If you require a sighted guide, or any other access services to fully participate, please let us know as soon as you can. 
  • Email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org or call 715-212-9140.

Registration
Please fill out the required registration form. In case of technical difficulties, please email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org for assistance.

Loud and Proud! Maximizing Your Accessibility Info for Guests

Event Description: A cultural institution’s website is often the first point of contact for guests with disabilities. Are the bathrooms accessible? Where are the elevators? Can services like sign language interpretation be requested, and if so, how? Join Cultural Access Collaborative as we examine how to offer practical and sustainable information to guests about your organization’s accessibility.

Event Date: Wednesday, November 8

Event Time: 12:00 noon to 1:00 PM Central Time

Who Should Attend: Audience facing staff at your organization, or anyone interested or involved in guest relations.

Location: Zoom. Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email 24 hours prior to the event. Please be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration form or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services.

Cost: FREE. While this program is free, a $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may make a tax deductible online donation to the Collab at any time.

Registration: Join us by completing this event registration form! Note that registrations will close on November 7 at 11:55 PM. In case of technical difficulties, please email info@CulturalAccessCollab.org for assistance.


Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

LEAD Conference Share Out 2023

Event graphic on blue background with logo for Cultural Access Collaborative. At top right, a white chevron frames the event details: "LEAD Share Out 2023. Tuesday, October 3rd. Noon to 1 PM CT. Zoom." At bottom left is a dark blue circle labeled "Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability." In center, a photo of two conference attendees from Illinois, Rachel Arfa and Tina Childress. Rachel speaks in a microphone as Tina handles a decorated shoe box. They sit at a round table sprinkled with craft supplies.

Event Description: Are you curious about the Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability (LEAD) conference? Did you want to attend but couldn’t? Join The Collab for a Zoom Lunch and Learn about this year’s LEAD experience. Four representatives from the Collab will share takeaways from their focus areas and lead a live discussion with our arts and culture accessibility community. Come for the best practice takeaways and bring your questions about LEAD!

Date: October 3, 2023

Time: Noon to 1:00 PM, Central Time

Location: Zoom. Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration form or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services.

Cost: FREE. While this program is free, a $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may make a tax deductible online donation to the Collab at any time.

Registration: Join us by completing this event registration form!

Join Us!


Image Description: Event graphic on blue background with logo for Cultural Access Collaborative. At top right, a white chevron frames the event details: “LEAD Share Out 2023. Tuesday, October 3rd. Noon to 1 PM CT. Zoom.” At bottom left is a dark blue circle labeled “Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability.” At center, a photo taken by Susan Friel shows two conference attendees from Illinois. Rachel Arfa speaks into a microphone as Tina Childress handles a decorated shoe box. They sit at a round table sprinkled with craft supplies.

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Engaging Multisensory Experiences in Outdoor Spaces

Event graphic consists of five rectangular tiles containing imagery and text. The tile at top center reads "Cultural Access Collaborative, Thursday, May 11 at 3:00 PM." A green leaf is draped over an open hand. Below, a forest green tile at bottom left reads, "Engaging Multisensory Experiences in Outdoor Spaces. Andy Slater at Garfield Park Conservatory." The remaining tiles are images of a microphone hovering above purple lillies; broad-leaved tropical plants; and a person standing on a green, black and gold-patterned surface, holding a white cane with tip touching the floor.

Gather with the Collab for an in-person exploration at Garfield Park Conservatory to savor the summer season in Chicago with this workshop devoted to touch, sound, smell, and taste in nature! We are joined by Andy Slater, Chicago-based media artist, sound designer, teaching artist, and disability advocate and members of the Garfield Park Conservatory Alliance Team for a site-specific exploration of multisensory approaches in outdoor spaces. Grow your own personal toolkit for creating sensory opportunities for your visitors in this immersive program and learn how other cultural organizations are increasing their offerings.  

 

Details

Date and Time: Thursday, May 11th from 3:00 to 4:30 PM Central Time

Location: 300 N. Central Park Ave., Chicago, IL 60624. The Conservatory is located near the intersection of North Central Park Ave. and Lake St. If you’d like to learn more about what to expect on your visit, here is a social narrative.

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided for the facilitated program. Exploration of the Conservatory grounds will follow. Please inform us of any additional requests that would enable you to participate. You may also reach us at 773-203-5039 to request services. Masks are strongly encouraged when not actively eating or drinking.

Cost: FREE, $5 suggested donation

Registration: Please register at https://tinyurl.com/yubz3tae

 

Featured Speaker

Andy extends his left hand up to the sky. He is holding a Recording device with an attached microphone. The microphone has a small, black foam ball covering it. The sun shines down on Andy’s oversized amber sunglasses, bushy red beard, and thick green sweater. Photo credit: Charlie Simokiatis.

Andy Slater is a blind Chicago-based media artist, writer, performer, and Disability advocate/loudmouth.

Andy holds a Masters in Sound Arts and Industries from Northwestern University and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is a 2022 United States Artists fellow, 2022-2023 Leonardo Crip Tech Incubator fellow and a 2018 3Arts/Bodies of Work fellow at the University of Illinois Chicago.

He is a member of the Society of Visually Impaired Sound Artists and a teaching artist with the Atlantic Center for the Arts’ Young SoundSeekers program, Midwest Society For Acoustic Ecology, and Creative Users’ Sensory Shift program.

Andy’s current work focuses on advocacy for accessible art and technology, Alt-Text for sound and image, the phonology of the blind body, spatial audio for extended reality, and sound design for film, dance, and digital scent design.

Read Andy’s full biography at https://tinyurl.com/2p8r9per

 

 

REGISTRATION LINK!

 

Registration Process

Please register at https://tinyurl.com/yubz3tae. Registered participants will receive an email the day prior to the event with additional details. Please ensure that Info@CulturalAccessCollab.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

 

Parking and Transit

Parking: The Conservatory has a free visitor parking lot with designated accessible parking spots located in the northeast corner. There are paved pathways from the parking lot to the building entrance, as well as ramps and a push button automated door.

Public Transit: You can take the Green Line to the Conservatory Stop. The glass building of the conservatory is just north of Lake Street on the West side of the street. Please note that as of April 27, the Harlem-bound platform elevator at Conservatory (Green Line) has been fixed, and the station should now be accessible again. Check the CTA’s accessibility alerts for the most up-to-date information.

Bicycles: Bike Corrals and a Divvy bike station can be found in front of the building on Central Park Avenue.

 

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided for the facilitated program. Exploration of the Conservatory grounds will follow. Please inform us of any additional requests that would enable you to participate. You may also reach us at 773-203-5039 to request services.

COVID Policy: Masks are strongly encouraged when not actively eating or drinking.

Wheelchairs: There are a limited number of wheelchairs available for free use on site. They are checked out with a photo ID on a first come, first served basis. Wheelchairs will be thoroughly wiped down between visitors.

Social Narrative: If you’d like to learn more about what to expect at Garfield Park Conservatory, here is a social narrative to prepare you for your visit.

More information about accessibility at Garfield Park Conservatory can be found at https://garfieldconservatory.org/accessibility/.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

 

Suggested Donation

While most programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Cultural Access Collaborative: Steering Committee Info Session (2 of 2)

In this relaxed, “Ask Me Anything” info session, join current members of the Cultural Access Collaborative Steering Committee to delve into the responsibilities of the Collab. The Steering Committee is made up of volunteers from all walks of experience in cultural spaces, focused on the varying aspects of our mission. Learn about the Steering Committee’s application process, professional development planning, equipment loan program management, the access calendar, and other opportunities to engage!

As Cultural Access Collaborative’s work grows to include all of Illinois, we are adding representation to the Steering Committee, and hosting professional development programs across the state. If you or a fellow Illinoisan is interested in being involved on a leadership level with the Collab, then this is a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more about what the expectations are.

2023 is a recruitment year for the Steering Committee, and we look forward to getting to know more passionate allies and advocates for cultural accessibility. Come with your thoughts and questions. We look forward to connecting!

Image: Text reads, "Ask Us Anything! Cultural Access Collaborative. Session One: March 30 at 4:00 PM. Session Two: April 11 at Noon." Clare Killy, Collab Co-Chair, is pictured at left. Clare is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer. Hillary Pearson, Collab Co-Chair, is picture at right. Hillary is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Details

Date and Time:

Session One: Thursday, March 30th from 4:00 to 5:00 PM Central Time
Session Two: Tuesday, April 11th from 12:00 Noon to 1:00 PM Central Time

Platform: Zoom (link will be shared with registrants)

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided.

Cost: FREE

Registration:

Please register for Session One here.

Please register for Session Two here.

 

SESSION ONE REGISTRATION LINK!

SESSION TWO REGISTRATION LINK!

 

 


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@CulturalAccessCollab.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

ASL Interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Application

If you would like to apply to join our steering committee, Please complete the Steering Committee Application Google Form and attach your resume/cv where prompted. Note that this submission process does require a Google email address. If you require any assistance or are unable to submit your form electronically, please contact Info@CulturalAccessCollab.Org

 


About the Speakers

Clare is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer.

Clare Killy, Steering Committee Co-Chair (she/her/hers) is Vice President of Digital Experiences at Aspire. She leads Aspire’s DEI Consultation services, which include training and support for businesses and organizations specific to inclusive practices. She also leads the production of Aspire’s free resources for the community to raise awareness, share knowledge and invite advocacy around disability inclusion – including the Amplify Inclusion podcast and The Inclusion Exchange webinar series. Clare also oversees the Virtual Life Coaching team, which includes Life Consultants who provide customized life skills coaching for adults with disabilities. Clare has over a decade of professional experience working with individuals of all ages, families and providers across diverse environments.

Clare joined the Steering Committee in 2019, becoming a Co-Chair in 2021. She is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer.

Favorite Cultural Memory: My father is a professional artist and I recall my first time seeing his work in a gallery after having witnessed the lengthy artistic process that led to that point. Seeing the artist in action, and then the final result on such pristine display taught me to consider the process as much as the product – to this day, when I walk through a gallery space, I wonder about the idea that sparked each piece and the dynamic journey that brought it to life.

 

Hillary is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Hillary Pearson, Steering Committee Co-Chair (she/her/hers) is the Program Manager of Accessibility Services in the Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services at the American Library Association. Previously, Hillary spent 12 years in patron services and operations at the Harris Theater for Music and Dance, working directly with companies to ensure front of house needs were met, connecting renters with resources and options for accessible programming, and communicating daily operations in the facility. Hillary is excited to further the accessibility goals of the ALA, as well as learn from and with other professionals from Chicagoland cultural institutions.

Hillary joined the Steering Committee in 2017, becoming a Co-Chair in 2021. She is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Memorable Cultural Experience: As a vocal performance major at Northwestern, a small volunteer group of singers had the chance to perform comedic opera scenes in English at the Kohl Children’s Museum up in Glenview a few times a year. It was a lot of fun performing opera for these kids in such a nontraditional setting (sometimes they even laughed with us instead of at us!), and it created a unique outreach opportunity for both the university and the museum.

 

 


 

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Cultural Access Collaborative: Steering Committee Info Session (1 of 2)

In this relaxed, “Ask Me Anything” info session, join current members of the Cultural Access Collaborative Steering Committee to delve into the responsibilities of the Collab. The Steering Committee is made up of volunteers from all walks of experience in cultural spaces, focused on the varying aspects of our mission. Learn about the Steering Committee’s application process, professional development planning, equipment loan program management, the access calendar, and other opportunities to engage!

As Cultural Access Collaborative’s work grows to include all of Illinois, we are adding representation to the Steering Committee, and hosting professional development programs across the state. If you or a fellow Illinoisan is interested in being involved on a leadership level with the Collab, then this is a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more about what the expectations are.

2023 is a recruitment year for the Steering Committee, and we look forward to getting to know more passionate allies and advocates for cultural accessibility. Come with your thoughts and questions. We look forward to connecting!

Image: Text reads, "Ask Us Anything! Cultural Access Collaborative. Session One: March 30 at 4:00 PM. Session Two: April 11 at Noon." Clare Killy, Collab Co-Chair, is pictured at left. Clare is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer. Hillary Pearson, Collab Co-Chair, is picture at right. Hillary is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Details

Date and Time:

Session One: Thursday, March 30th from 4:00 to 5:00 PM Central Time
Session Two: Tuesday, April 11th from 12:00 Noon to 1:00 PM Central Time

Platform: Zoom (link will be shared with registrants)

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided.

Cost: FREE

Registration:

Please register for Session One here.

Please register for Session Two here.

 

SESSION ONE REGISTRATION LINK!

SESSION TWO REGISTRATION LINK!

 

 


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@CulturalAccessCollab.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

ASL Interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Application

If you would like to apply to join our steering committee, Please complete the Steering Committee Application Google Form and attach your resume/cv where prompted. Note that this submission process does require a Google email address. If you require any assistance or are unable to submit your form electronically, please contact Info@CulturalAccessCollab.Org

 


About the Speakers

Clare is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer.

Clare Killy, Steering Committee Co-Chair (she/her/hers) is Vice President of Digital Experiences at Aspire. She leads Aspire’s DEI Consultation services, which include training and support for businesses and organizations specific to inclusive practices. She also leads the production of Aspire’s free resources for the community to raise awareness, share knowledge and invite advocacy around disability inclusion – including the Amplify Inclusion podcast and The Inclusion Exchange webinar series. Clare also oversees the Virtual Life Coaching team, which includes Life Consultants who provide customized life skills coaching for adults with disabilities. Clare has over a decade of professional experience working with individuals of all ages, families and providers across diverse environments.

Clare joined the Steering Committee in 2019, becoming a Co-Chair in 2021. She is a white woman with brown hair. She is positioned in front of a brick wall and wearing a blue shirt underneath a gray blazer.

Favorite Cultural Memory: My father is a professional artist and I recall my first time seeing his work in a gallery after having witnessed the lengthy artistic process that led to that point. Seeing the artist in action, and then the final result on such pristine display taught me to consider the process as much as the product – to this day, when I walk through a gallery space, I wonder about the idea that sparked each piece and the dynamic journey that brought it to life.

 

Hillary is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Hillary Pearson, Steering Committee Co-Chair (she/her/hers) is the Program Manager of Accessibility Services in the Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services at the American Library Association. Previously, Hillary spent 12 years in patron services and operations at the Harris Theater for Music and Dance, working directly with companies to ensure front of house needs were met, connecting renters with resources and options for accessible programming, and communicating daily operations in the facility. Hillary is excited to further the accessibility goals of the ALA, as well as learn from and with other professionals from Chicagoland cultural institutions.

Hillary joined the Steering Committee in 2017, becoming a Co-Chair in 2021. She is a white woman with a round face and medium length brown, straight hair. She wears square-framed, purple glasses and a purple sweater and looks directly into the camera with a smile.

Memorable Cultural Experience: As a vocal performance major at Northwestern, a small volunteer group of singers had the chance to perform comedic opera scenes in English at the Kohl Children’s Museum up in Glenview a few times a year. It was a lot of fun performing opera for these kids in such a nontraditional setting (sometimes they even laughed with us instead of at us!), and it created a unique outreach opportunity for both the university and the museum.

 

 


 

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Inclusive Employment in Arts & Culture: Building Partnerships for Hiring

Text reads: "Inclusive Employment in Arts & Culture: Building Partnerships for Hiring. Central West Community Center, 2102 W. Ogden Ave. Friday, March 24, 3:30-5:00pm CT." Logos: Cultural Access Collaborative and MOPD (Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities). Photographs: 1) Red brick exterior of Central West Community Center on a sunny fall day. 2) Colorful mural with zig zag edges and diverse individuals, including: someone with a prosthetic leg; someone with a guide dog; someone using a wheelchair; several people forming ASL letters with their hands; and more. 3) Interior showing an open door and a doorplate that reads Room A, MOPD Career Center and includes raised braille letters.

Join us for in person networking at the new MOPD Career Center!

Are you a hiring manager or supervisor at an arts or cultural institution looking to expand your team? Let’s build local connections with community agencies to help you source new talent and create career opportunities for people with disabilities!

The program will begin with remarks from MOPD’s Commissioner Rachel Arfa, followed by structured networking among cultural administrators and community agencies. Attendees will leave with new community connections and resources to help diversify their hiring initiatives.

Light refreshments will be provided. Masks are strongly encouraged.

 

Who Should Attend?

Cultural administrators responsible for the recruitment, hiring and onboarding of staff members at arts and cultural organizations; or representatives from service organizations working to advance employment opportunities.

 

Details

Date and Time: Friday, March 24th from 3:30 to 5:00 PM Central Time

Location: Central West Community Center, 2102 W. Ogden Ave, Chicago, IL 60612

Program Accessibility: Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided for the formal program. Networking opportunities and free exploration of the MOPD field office and murals will follow the formal program. Please inform us of any additional requests that would enable you to participate in the networking portion of the evening. You may also reach us at 773-203-5039 to request services.

Cost: FREE, $5 suggested donation

Registration: Please register at https://tinyurl.com/yc4sft4x

 

Featured Speaker

Rachel is smiling in front of the Chicago flag.

Rachel Arfa (she/her/hers) was appointed Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities (MOPD) by Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot in July 2020.

Commissioner Arfa is the first deaf commissioner of MOPD, and the highest-ranking deaf person to serve in a City government leadership role.   Arfa comes to MOPD with years of experience as a disability and civil rights attorney.   She has held numerous civic and leadership roles, including advocating to make Chicago’s cultural spaces accessible to people with disabilities.

As MOPD Commissioner, Arfa leads the City of Chicago’s efforts to make Chicago a more accessible city.  MOPD provides services including in the areas of independent living services (information and referral, home-delivered meals, and Personal Assistant Services), employment and youth transition services, home modifications, assistive devices, accessible housing and architectural accessibility.  MOPD also creates policies on disability accessibility, accessible transportation, and emergency preparedness.

Arfa is a graduate of the University of Michigan (B.A. American Culture) and the University of Wisconsin School of Law (J.D.)

 

Meet the MOPD Career Center Staff

Career Center Staff will be available to meet and greet during the networking portion of this event. You can learn more about the MOPD Career Center staff here.

 

Registration Process

REGISTRATION LINK!

Registered participants will receive an email the day prior to the event with additional details. Please ensure that Info@CulturalAccessCollab.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Transit and Parking

Getting to MOPD via public transportation: The field office building is a 10 minute walk from the Illinois Medical District Blue Line stop (when you exit the station, walk south on Damen Avenue until you reach Ogden, then turn right and walk southwest on Ogden and you will see the building after a few blocks). You can also take the 157 bus which stops right in front of the building, or the 50 bus and get off at Damen and Polk, then turn left on Ogden.

Parking: Part of the field office parking lot will be available to the public (enter on Ogden Avenue southwest entrance). Additional parking is available at Cook County Juvenile Center Parking Facility located at 1100 S. Hamilton Avenue, $2.00 for the entire day.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided for the formal program. Networking opportunities and free exploration of the MOPD field office and murals will follow the formal program. Please inform us of any additional requests that would enable you to participate in the networking portion of the evening. You may also reach us at 773-203-5039 to request services.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Suggested Donation

While most programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

“Nothing About Us Without Us”: Meaningful Collaboration with the Disability Community

Do you talk to guests after a show or send out mass surveys? Do you work with accessibility consultants or develop your own advisory board? Do you co-create and receive critical feedback from people with lived experience in the disability community? Learn from our steering committee members about their experience with building each rung in the collaboration ladder. Explore tangible ways to strengthen a more genuine and responsive connection to the disability community every step along the way.

Event Graphic reads: "Nothing About Us Without Us." Meaningful Collaboration with the Disability Community. Feb. 9 Noon CT Zoom. Logo for Cultural Access Collaborative includes a three by three grid of colorful triangles.

Details

Date and Time: Thursday, February 9 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Central Time

Program Accessibility: CART and ASL Interpretation will be provided.

Cost: FREE, $5 suggested donation

Platform: Zoom (link will be shared with registrants)

Registration: Please register at https://tinyurl.com/24y6n6dj

REGISTRATION LINK!

 


 

About the Speakers

Jesse is a white man in his mid-30's who's once boyish good looks have retreated faster than his hairline. He's working on convincing himself that baldness is a good look. His blue eyes look through a pair of round overpriced warby parker glasses. He is pictured in a wrinkled light blue button down against a white background.

Jesse Swanson (he/him/his) is a producer, arts administrator and comedian. He has led organizations large and small and presented original work across the country and around the world. Originally from the east coast, Jesse began his career in Philadelphia, where he produced and directed original sketch, stand-up improvisation and several world premier comedic plays and musicals. His independently produced work won acclaim at The Philadelphia and DC Fringe Festivals as well as the CrisisArt Festival in Italy. After deciding to take comedy a little more seriously, he came to Chicago in 2012 and went to work for The Second City where he oversaw talent development and production of new work, partnering with companies like The Kennedy Center, LucasFilm and Disney. As an artist with a disability Jesse is an organizer and advocate for access in the arts and passionately pursuing making all art accessible to everyone.

Jesse is a white man in his mid-30’s who’s once boyish good looks have retreated faster than his hairline. He’s working on convincing himself that baldness is a good look. His blue eyes look through a pair of round overpriced warby parker glasses. He is pictured in a wrinkled light blue button down against a white background.

 

Susan is a white woman with a full face of freckles and a smile. Her short hair is various shades of blue that match her eyes. She is outdoors in front of blurry greenery in the background.

Susan A. Friel (she/her/hers) is an educator, artist and lifelong learner who currently manages education and engagement programs for the City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE). Susan’s path along the way weaves in, out and around schools, museums and arts organizations across the globe, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Spain, Ethiopia and LA. In 2018 she initiated the first exploration of the Chicago Cultural Center through touch and sound which inspired the installation of a touch gallery and Learning Lab which celebrates all the senses. She is honored to have contributed to the inspirational book that continues to feed her spirit daily: Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit.

Susan is a white woman with a full face of freckles and a smile. Her short hair is various shades of blue that match her eyes. She is outdoors in front of blurry greenery in the background.

 

Bill is a white man in his 40’s with short, dark hair and beard, wearing round glasses. He is pictured in a blue dress shirt seated in front of green leafy plants at the zoo and smiling to camera.

Bill Green (he/him/his) is the Hart Prins Fund Accessibility & Inclusion Manager at Lincoln Park Zoo. He uses his experience from working in the disability community to foster accessibility and inclusion in all environments where people engage with the zoo. Personal experience also informs Bill’s work. Since birth, he has been low vision. He has also been a lifelong enthusiast of zoos and museums and the diverse ways people interact with these spaces. Bill has consulted with many cultural institution in Chicago, including serving as an inaugural member on The Second City’s Accessibility Board.

Bill is a white man in his 40’s with short, dark hair and beard, wearing round glasses. He is pictured in a blue dress shirt seated in front of green leafy plants at the zoo and smiling to camera.

 

Andy is a white man in his mid-thirties with dark blonde hair, cut short on the sides and grown long in the middle and pushed to the side. He has round cheeks, deep dimples and blue eyes squinted in a smile. He has a short beard that is reddish brown. He wears glasses with blue and brown frames.

Andy Wilson (he/him/his) is a House Manager & Accessibility Coordinator at The Goodman Theatre. Prior to his time at Goodman, he worked at the Shedd Aquarium as well as the Museum of Science & Industry. Early in his journey as a trans man, he felt like there was no longer a place for him in theatre, but realized that he could be a part of making the arts more inclusive for a much wider range of people.

Andy is a white man in his mid-thirties with dark blonde hair, cut short on the sides and grown long in the middle and pushed to the side. He has round cheeks, deep dimples and blue eyes squinted in a smile. He has a short beard that is reddish brown. He wears glasses with blue and brown frames.

 

 

 


REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@CulturalAccessCollab.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

ASL Interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Suggested Donation

While most programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure Cultural Access Collaborative’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to the Collaborative are tax deductible.

Cultural Access Collaborative is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a CityArts Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Rescue Plan as well as a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

An Open Book Conversation with Rahnee Patrick and Grace Tsao

Support CCAC and enjoy a virtual fireside conversation with activists Rahnee Patrick and Grace Tsao. They’ll discuss Alice Wong’s new book, Year of the Tiger: An Activist’s Life, and offer insight into what it takes to create spaces for disabled people to be in conversation with one another and the world. An audience Q&A portion will follow.

Details

Date and Time: Monday, December 5 from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM Central Time

Program Accessibility: CART and ASL Interpretation will be provided.

Cost: $25 admission

Platform: Zoom (link will be shared with registrants)

 

REGISTRATION LINK!

 


Acquiring the Book

To better frame the featured conversation, we encourage you to read Year of the Tiger: An Activist’s Life by Alice Wong in advance of the event. 

You can purchase a copy here.

 

Accessibility

ASL interpretation and Real-Time Captioning will be provided.

 

Admission

CCAC is committed to free programming and resources throughout the year. We need your help to continue this important work. Individual tickets are available for $25.

A limited number of free tickets are available for attendees who are unable to purchase them due to financial circumstances. 

If you would like to attend and need a complimentary ticket, please email your request to info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org with the subject line Fundraiser Financial Access Request.

 

About the Author

Alice Wong is a disabled activist, media maker, and research consultant based in San Francisco, California. She is the founder and director of the Disability Visibility Project, an online community dedicated to creating, sharing, and amplifying disability media and culture. Alice is also the host and co-producer of the Disability Visibility podcast and co-partner in a number of collaborations such as #CripTheVote and Access Is Love. From 2013 to 2015, Alice served as a member of the National Council on Disability, an appointment by President Barack Obama. You can follow her on Twitter: @SFdirewolf. For more: disabilityvisibilityproject.com.

 

About the Speakers

Rahnee Patrick, MA is the first Asian American and disabled Director of the Rehabilitation Services, a Division of the Illinois Department of Human Services. The oldest of four, Rahnee‘s US-born father is an Air Force veteran who met her mother, of Ubonratchathani, Thailand, during the Viet Nam Conflict. The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) awarded Rahnee the Paul Hearne Award, as an emerging national leader. Rahnee is a proud aunt who lives with her spouse Mike Ervin in downtown Chicago with their two small dogs, Mao Mao and Roxy Pops.

Grace Tsao has spent her career working in higher education, non-profit, and state government. She has a B.S. in News-Editorial Journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, an M.S. in Cultural Foundations of Education with a concentration in Multicultural Education from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, and an M.A. in Sociology from Loyola University Chicago where her focus was on race, gender, and disability. Grace teaches social science online to undergraduate students and is the Chair and Advocacy Chair of the Statewide Independent Living Council of Illinois.

Noa Fields (moderator) is a trans writer with hearing aids. She is the author of the poetry chapbook With, and has also been published in Tripwire, Anomaly, Zoeglossia, Elderly Mag, Tyger Quarterly, and Sixty Inches from Center, among others. She is the Events & Accessibility Coordinator at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago and a 2022 fellow with Zoeglossia and Disability Lead. 

 


 

REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

ASL Interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Cost: $25 admission

While most CCAC programs are free, the $25 admission helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by grants from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lunch and Learn: Ask About Alt Text with Bojana Coklyat

Spend an hour with Bojana Coklyat discussing what Alt Text is, tips for writing it, and the artistry involved. Capturing the important elements of an image can be challenging, especially when describing people in photos and identifying the “purpose” of the picture. Bring your questions and join us for some Alt Text practice to put our skills to the test!

CCAC Lunch & Learns are informal discussion forums open to the community. CCAC Steering Committee members facilitate sessions, and we encourage attendees to participate in open dialogue.

Details

Date and Time: Thursday, November 3 from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM Central Time

Program Accessibility: CART and ASL Interpretation will be provided.

Cost: FREE, $5 suggested donation

Platform: Zoom (link will be shared with registrants)

 

REGISTRATION LINK!

 


 

Speakers

Bojana Coklyat is a disabled artist, 2019-2020 J. William Fulbright alumni and previous project leader at the NYC Museum Arts and Culture Access Consortium (MAC). In 2019, she curated “Crip Imponderabilia”, the first gallery exhibit at NYU centering all disabled artists and disability culture. Around this time, she began collaborating with Shannon Finnegan on the Alt-Text as Poetry project. Recently, Coklyat has taken on the position of associate producer on a film funded by the American Foundation for the Blind, featuring a variety of different people in the blind community.

Event graphic reads: "Lunch and Learn: Ask About Alt Text with Bojana Coklyat, 11.3.2022." Bojana, a white woman with blond hair pulled back into a ponytail gives off casual and cheerful vibes. She looks directly at the camera, holding a large cup of coffee. She is in a cute little lunch spot, wearing a white T-shirt and long chain necklace.

[Image description. Event graphic reads: “Lunch and Learn: Ask About Alt Text with Bojana Coklyat, 11.3.2022.” Bojana, a white woman with blond hair pulled back into a ponytail gives off casual and cheerful vibes. She looks directly at the camera, holding a large cup of coffee. She is in a cute little lunch spot, wearing a white T-shirt and long chain necklace.]

 


 

REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

ASL Interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (with a streaming link option) will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by grants from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

CCAC Social

We at the CCAC have loved getting together at our virtual events these past few years, and now we are super excited to share our passion for accessibility in person again (socially distanced of course)!  

We welcome you to join our social event at the expanded Steppenwolf campus, in their new full-service Tap House Bar with attached outdoor patio. We’ll be gathering casually (with or without a cocktail in hand) to chat accessibility-related topics with members of the Chicagoland accessibility community. 

Exchange tips, share victories, commiserate, plan world domination… all with a focus on the small changes we are making at our organizations to incrementally make a big difference!

REGISTRATION LINK!

Perks:

  • FREE, $5 suggested donation
  • Registration includes one (1) free alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage. 
  • A cash and credit / debit card bar will also be available. 

Location:

  • Tap House Bar, 1646 N Halsted St (at the southern end of Steppenwolf campus).
  • Attached outdoor patio space will also be open, weather permitting.

Transit and Parking:

  • Free parking at 1624 N. Halsted.
  • Near CTA Red Line’s North/Clybourne station. 

The following accommodations will be available:

  • wheelchair access
  • accessible tables
  • ASL interpretation 
  • menus in Braille and large print
  • increased lighting
  • no background music
  • all-gender restrooms
  • masks required when not actively eating or drinking

All CCAC events are scent-free; please refrain from wearing products with fragrance such as perfume, cologne and lotion.

To request additional accommodations, please contact us by email at info@chicagoculturalaccess.org or call Matt Lauterbach at 773-203-5039.

 


REGISTRATION LINK!

What to Expect

Once you register, you will have the option to add this event to your calendar. ASL interpretation will be provided. Additional accommodation requests can be submitted via RSVP.

You will receive an email reminder the day before the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

American Sign Language Interpretation will be provided.

Additional accommodation requests can be submitted via RSVP. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 773-203-5039 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by grants from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

LEAD Conference Share Out 2022

Gain key takeaways from your Chicago colleagues who attended the Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability conference. Hear what folks were excited by and challenged to try next in their accessibility journey.

The LEAD Conference provides an opportunity for arts and culture professionals to develop accessibility best practices and resources; engage in conversations with colleagues and experts from around the world; and learn practical methods for designing inclusive arts experiences and environments.

REGISTRATION LINK!

Program Accessibility: CART and ASL Interpretation will be provided.

 


REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 419-262-1886 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, The MacArthur Funds for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by grants from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

BIPOC Providers Part Two: Audio Describers

BIPOC Providers Part Two: Audio Describers

May 10th 3:00 PM Central Time

How should we describe people who vary in terms of race, gender, disability, age and body shape? Why might the identity and voice of the describer matter? Join us as our guest speakers explore the importance of representation and cultural sensitivity in our decisions about who to hire. Learn how the lived experiences of our audio description providers can impact the accessibility of our content, and the experiences of our audience.

Featured presenters:

Thomas Reid, moderator. Soon after becoming blind in 2004, Thomas Reid decided to re-ignite a dormant interest in audio production. After years of combining his interest in audio with advocacy, in 2014 he was selected as a New Voice Scholar by the Association of Independence in Radio. During that same year he began his podcast Reid My Mind Radio; where he pairs narrative storytelling  with music and sound design bringing you compelling people impacted by all degrees of blindness and disability.

Through his Flipping the Script on Audio Description series, Reid continues to explore the art by going beyond surface level topics and examining its implications on the community.

As a voice talent and Audio Description Narrator, Reid has appeared on several Netflix projects. He facilitates workshops and provides consultations on various accessibility and audio description related topics. Thomas serves as moderator and panelist for discussions on audio description, podcasting, inclusion, adjusting to blindness and more.

Nefertiti Matos Olivares is a fervent advocate for accessible culture, tech, and healthcare. As a blind Latina-American, she brings a wealth of cultural competency to all that she does. Specific to her work as a bilingual Audio Description professional, Nefertiti holds such roles as Narrator, quality Control Specialist, and writer. She strongly believes in doing her part to bring about a world in which universal access is the norm, not the exception.

Ashleigh Braggs is an audio describer and trainer of audio describers. She started creating described experiences for audiences who are blind or have low vision in 2015. She’s had the privilege of describing dozens and dozens of experiences including, live animal presentations, theater, opera and multiple genres of dance. Describing the culture of the Black diaspora represents a particular passion of hers.

REGISTRATION LINK

Who Should Attend? 

This session will present resources, concepts and the sharing of perspectives for anyone who is interested in working towards greater equity, inclusion, and diversity in the hiring of access providers at your organization.

Also in this Series

Join us on Tuesday, May 3rd at 3:00 PM Central Time for BIPOC Providers Part One: ASL Interpreters. Register for the May 3rd Program. 


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

REGISTRATION LINK

Recording Available Following Event

A recording will be shared on our Past Programs page following the event. The video will be captioned and audio described.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 419-262-1886 to request services. Thank you!

Suggested Donation

While ICAN and CCAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! CCAC is a registered 501c3 and all donations to CCAC are tax deductible.

This session was planned by the Illinois Cultural Accessibility Network (ICAN), made possible through the funding of the Illinois Arts Council Agency (IACA) and the support of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC).

BIPOC Providers Part One: ASL Interpreters

BIPOC Providers Part One: ASL Interpreters 

May 3rd 3:00 PM Central Time

How does language mediate and affect access to crucial information and spaces? Why might the identity of the interpreter matter? Join us as our guest speakers explore the importance of representation and cultural sensitivity in our decisions about who to hire. Learn how the lived experiences of our ASL interpreters can impact the accessibility of our content, and the experiences of our audience. 

Featured Presenters

Benro Ogunyipe, MPA, Benro Ogunyipe served for six years as president, vice president, and chair of the board of National Black Deaf Advocates, Inc. He is the author of Black Deaf Culture Through Lens of History, a short commentary on the history, culture, and education of Black Deaf People for the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) supported by the U.S. Department of Education. He also writes stories, accomplishments, and recognition of the Black Deaf Community.

Benro currently serves as the Executive Director of the Illinois Deaf and Hard of Hearing Commission. He previously worked for the Illinois Department of Human Services as Senior Accessibility Specialist, Reasonable Accommodation Specialist, and Investigator of the ADA/Section 504 Discrimination Complaints for 17 years. In 2014 and again in 2016, U.S. President Barack Obama appointed Benro to the National Council on Disability. Benro was also appointed by three different Illinois Governors to public bodies and was an appointed board member of the National Association of the Deaf. He is a seasoned guest lecturer at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Disability Studies and Columbia College Chicago’s Interpreter Training Program on Multicultural Issues. 

Benro received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Gallaudet University and a Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) degree from DePaul University, School of Public Service. 

Melva Flores is a Trilingual (American Sign Language, English and Spanish) Interpreter of Puerto Rican decent. She received her B.A. in ASL-English interpretation from Columbia College of Chicago in 2000. Melva has been interpreting for almost 24 years and holds the Illinois Master Level Interpreter Licensure and the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Certificate of Interpretation and Certificate of Transliteration. She is a full-time freelance staff interpreter who has interpreted for a variety of interpreting settings. These include, but not limited to: Mayor Lori Lightfoot and other elected officials, fortune 500 businesses, mental health, medical, legal, court, elementary schools, Colleges/Universities, cruises, theatrical, festivals, church and community events. She often interprets interactively between her three languages, where she is the only interpreter present and interprets into/from all three languages, either consecutively or simultaneously. Melva is the founder, and past President, of the Illinois Chapter of Mano a Mano. Although in the field for many years, Melva believes that there is always room for growth and welcomes opportunities to continue to enhance her skills. She has mentored several Interpreter Training Students and is currently in school to receive her Master Mentor Certificate.

Rorri Burton is a Black, queer, community-raised interpreter who hails from Chicago, where she began learning American Sign Language at an early age.  After graduating college with her degree in Deaf Education, she taught in school districts around the country for ten years, before beginning what she assumed would be a temporary foray into a career as a full time ASL Interpreter.  Twelve years and five cities later, and Rorri has worked as an interpreter in a variety of settings, including Video Relay Service, vacation cruises, Hollywood sets, operating rooms, theme parks and theaters, among others.  Her current pursuit involves coordinating a group of Black, Indigenous, Asian and Latinx interpreters who are providing ASL access for virtual and in-person assignments, with a focus on cultural connectedness. 

REGISTRATION LINK

Who Should Attend? 

This session will present resources, concepts and the sharing of perspectives for anyone who is interested in working towards greater equity, inclusion, and diversity in the hiring of access providers at your organization.

Also in this Series

Join us on Tuesday, May 10th at 3:00 PM Central Time for BIPOC Providers Part Two: Audio Describers. Register for the May 10th Program. 


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

REGISTRATION LINK

Recording Available Following Event

A recording will be shared on our Past Programs page following the event. The video will be captioned and audio described.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 419-262-1886 to request services. Thank you!

Suggested Donation

While ICAN and CCAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! CCAC is a registered 501c3 and all donations to CCAC are tax deductible.

This session was planned by the Illinois Cultural Accessibility Network (ICAN), made possible through the funding of the Illinois Arts Council Agency (IACA) and the support of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC).

Cultural Communities Advancing Disability Rights

How can cultural institutions utilize a disability rights lens to advance inclusion? Join CCAC for a brief history lesson on disability rights followed by a rich panel discussion integrating diverse perspectives. Expert guests will discuss components of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Principles of Universal Design (and more) as they relate to employees, patrons and artists. The session will close with a live Q&A portion and attendees are encouraged to submit questions in advance upon registration.

REGISTRATION LINK!

Program Accessibility: CART and ASL Interpretation will be provided.

 

Featured Presenters and Panelists:

Ashley Eisenmenger (she/her/hers)

Public Relations Coordinator, Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago

Ashley obtained a bachelor of arts degree in Organizational Communications from North Central College.  While at North Central, Ashley competed as the first NCAA triathlete with a disability that required sport-specific accommodations and advocated for the inclusion of people with disabilities in collegiate sports and the fitness and recreation industries. She currently works as the Public Relations Coordinator at Access Living.  Ashley speaks regularly to groups about topics such as perspective, adversity, performance, and disability.  She has given a Tedx talk and continues to advocate for the inclusion and integration of people with disabilities in the fitness world.

 

Charles R. Petrof (he/him/his)

Senior Attorney, Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago

Charles Petrof joined Access Living in 2016 as a Senior Attorney focusing on enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act. His litigation while at Access Living has focused on government and business accessibility, with significant work spanning the fields of medical care, education and transportation. He has also worked on several legislative efforts, including a successful effort to provide non-police mental and behavioral health support for non-violent individuals in crisis. Before coming to Access Living, Charles was a Supervisory Attorney at the Legal Assistance Foundation (now Legal Aid Chicago), and Senior Attorney at Chicago Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Inc. He specialized in litigation under the Fair Housing Act, and in access to public benefits. He received his BA from Northwestern University and his JD from Wayne State University.

 

Richard Costes (he/him/his)

Actor, Director, and Freelance Accessibility Consultant

Richard Costes is a Chicago-based actor, director, and accessibility consultant. Selected roles include Snout in Midsummer Night’s Dream at Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, Bosun in Mosquitoes at Steep Theatre Company, Arjun in Opportunities of Extinction (World Premiere) at Broken Nose Theatre, and Rev D./Baby in In the Blood at Red Tape Theatre.  Richard was one of 10 recipients of a 3Arts Award in 2019 and is also a 2020 ADA 25 Advancing Leadership Member. A 2006 graduate of Kent State University (B.A. Theatre) he has presented at Gallaudet University’s symposium on Visual Shakespeare and was a panelist and member of the 2019 Deaf Theatre Action Planning Session hosted by HowlRound at Emerson College and now sits on the board of the National Theatre of the Deaf. 

 

Whitney Hill (she/her/hers)

Accessibility Specialist at LCM Architects and Founder/Director of SPORK!

Whitney Hill is a specialist on accessibility with over a decade of experience in program management and communication. Her background in universal design and public accessibility combined with her personal background of identifying as someone with a disability give her a unique skillset to connect individuals with needed services, while also empowering them to advocate for themselves. Throughout her career, Whitney has aimed to ensure that public and institutional spaces are made readily accessible. She is also the founder and director of SPORK!, a 501 (c) 3 Nonprofit and online platform that serves as a voice for the disabled community.


REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 419-262-1886 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lunch and Learn: Aesthetics & Accessibility

February 18, 12- 1 pm CST

Let’s talk about the friction between aesthetics and accessibility and how cultural presenters, producers, and artists can engage to create work with accessibility baked into the aesthetic from the start.

CCAC Lunch & Learns are informal discussion forums open to the community. Sessions are facilitated by CCAC Steering Committee members and attendees are encouraged to participate in open dialogue.

REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 419-262-1886 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lunch and Learn: How to use the CCAC Equipment Loan Program

Curious about CCAC’s Equipment Loan Program and how it works? Join Steering Committee members past and present as we share the goals of the program, updates on  how to access resources, as well as how the program has helped shape accessibility initiatives for our users. This program will also explore some “how-to’s” and goals of our Access Calendar.

CCAC Lunch & Learns are informal discussion forums open to the community. Sessions are facilitated by CCAC Steering Committee members and attendees are encouraged to participate in open dialogue.

REGISTRATION LINK!

About our featured presenter, Brittany Pyle

Brittany Pyle (she/her) is the Director, Production and Audience Experience at the Chicago Humanities Festival. Her goal is to make the festival enjoyable and inclusive in all its stages, from ticket buying to the presentation of an event. She oversees the Audience Services and Production teams and serves as a primary liaison with the Festival’s 40+ cultural and community venue partners. From 2016-2021, Brittany was a steering committee member of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium, working to make the city’s cultural institutions accessible to people with disabilities and older adults. She holds a BFA in Photography from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

REGISTRATION LINK!

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 419-262-1886 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. We’ll accept cash and check the day-of, or you may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

An Open Book Conversation with Emily Ladau and Risa Jaz Rifkind

Raise funds for CCAC and enjoy a virtual fireside conversation with activists Emily Ladau and Risa Jaz Rifkind. They’ll discuss Emily’s new book, Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally, and dive into rich conversation around access, identity, intersectionality and more. An audience Q & A portion will follow.

To better frame the featured conversation, we encourage you to read Demystifying Disability by Emily Ladau in advance of the event. CCAC is committed to free programming and resources throughout the year. We need your help to continue this important work. Individual tickets are available for $20.

Featured Guests

Emily Ladau is a passionate disability rights activist, writer, storyteller, and digital communications consultant. She serves as the Editor in Chief of the Rooted in Rights Blog, a platform dedicated to amplifying authentic narratives on the disability experience through an intersectional lens. Her writing has been published in outlets including The New York Times, SELF, Salon, Vice, and HuffPost and her first book, Demystifying Disability, is being published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House, in fall 2021.

Risa Jaz Rifkind is passionate about inclusion and the arts and serves as the Treasurer for CCAC. In her full time role, she  is the Director of Civic Engagement and Marketing for Disability Lead. In 2020, she also participated on the Disability Inclusion Fund’s grant making committee. Additionally, she supports organizations develop, implement, and institutionalize disability inclusion through workshops, training, and customized approaches as an independent consultant. Risa received a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University.

REGISTER NOW!

Request A Free Book or Free Admission

A limited number of free tickets and copies of Demystifying Disability are available for attendees who are unable to purchase them due to financial circumstances.

If you would like to attend and need a complimentary ticket and/or book, please  email your request to info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org with the subject line Fundraiser Financial Access Request.


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 708-574-5190 to request services. Thank you!

REGISTER NOW!

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Access 101: An Introduction to Disability and Accessibility

What is disability? What is accessibility? This session will provide a basic introduction to the world of accessibility in cultural spaces.  Learn how accessibility is defined over a broad array of varying abilities, and how we can engage to create more accessible experiences in your cultural institutions.


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 708-574-5190 to request services. Thank you!

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Access 101: Individual Perspectives

How do people identify with disabilities? How varied are people’s experiences with access in different cultural spaces?  Join us as our guest speakers share their accessibility experiences both living and working in cultural spaces.  Learn what accessibility means from the perspectives of our panelists, and how we can think and engage with others around accessibility for all.


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 708-574-5190 to request services. Thank you!

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible.

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, and individual donors like you. In addition, this program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Lunch and Learn: Accessible Social Media

From Twitter to TikTok, social media is where a massive number of people find their news, seek entertainment, and socialize. But just how accessible are each of the big social networks? How do you navigate them with a disability, and how do you make the content you host on them accessible to others? Come to an informal Lunch & Learn where we share our experience with social networks, the resources on using them that we’ve found helpful, and discuss the pros and cons of what each platform offers us.

CCAC Lunch & Learns are informal discussion forums open to the community. Sessions are facilitated by CCAC Steering Committee members and attendees are encouraged to participate in open dialogue. To ensure a safe and intimate space, Lunch & Learn events are limited to a small group size and are typically not recorded.

Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

FREE, $5 suggested donation

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and Sign Language Interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path or call 708-212-5190 to request other access services, or to learn more about event accessibility.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, the $5 suggested donation helps to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. We’ll accept cash and check the day-of, or you may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible. 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, and individual donors like you.

Accessibility in Virtual Events: A Technical Step By Step

Our bet is that virtual events, hybrid experiences, and remote meetings are here to stay. We want to help events professionals know how to make accessible services work in platforms like Zoom and YouTube. Let our experienced panel of production people, event planners, and service providers show you how they get set up. Take a peek through the back end of platforms; learn what ASL interpreters, captioners, and audio describers need from you tech-wise in order to do their work; and anticipate what roles and responsibilities you’ll need to make virtual events run smoothly. Nerd out with us for a series of tutorials and Q&A!

Featured Speakers:

Risa Jaz Rifkind will discuss setting up ASL interpretation for virtual events.

Risa is a justice advocate who seeks to make change by shifting access to power and influence.

As Director of Civic Engagement and Marketing at ADA 25 Advancing Leadership, Risa propels the organization to realize its vision to have people with disabilities lead with power and influence. By identifying and developing strategic partnerships, Risa positions Members to take on leadership roles that advance their careers, civic engagement, and equity for people with disabilities. By integrating this vision into all internal and external communications, she leads Advancing Leadership’s brand awareness, public and private Member programming, and community engagement and outreach. She is also an Advancing Leadership Member.

Risa is passionate about the arts and serves as the Co-Chair of the Steering Committee for the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium as well as on its Board of Directors as Treasurer.

Eddie Medrano will discuss setting up captions for virtual events.

Eddie graduated with a B.A. in Arts, Entertainment & Media Management from Columbia College in 2010 and has been actively involved in live production since. With over 10 years of experience in live events, Eddie currently serves as the Assistant Director of Production at Chicago Humanities Festival. When not planning events or livestreaming from his basement, he lends an occasional hand to Fitzgerald’s Nightclub filling in as an AV tech and production manager.

Through his efforts, he is proud to stand among the countless individuals working to normalize accessibility in the arts and entertainment industry.

Bridget Melton will discuss setting up audio description for virtual events.

Bridget most recently live extemporaneously audio described the 2021 Presidential Inauguration and the 2020 Democratic National Convention, both partnered with Martin Wilde. As the main describer for Hamilton: An American Musical (Broadway in Chicago) during its three year residency in Chicago, she live described over 25 performances.  Active in the cultural accessibility community for many years, she works to create a welcoming environment for all.  Around the United States, and virtually, she can be found at various theatres promoting inclusion as an audio describer, advisor, or volunteer. She holds a BFA in Theatre Studies from SMU Meadows School of the Arts in Dallas, TX.

Hillary Pearson will discuss how to plan for virtual event roles and responsibilities.

Hillary (she/her/hers) is the Senior Manager of Operations and Accessibility Services at the Harris Theater, overseeing daily facility communications, front of house plans surrounding visiting companies’ events, and accessible services for engagements. Hillary works internally and externally to inform staff and renters on accessibility features in-house and share further resources on accessibility, maintains relevant access and inclusion training initiatives for all users of the space, and helps navigate collaboration with service providers. Hillary has also recently been selected as a Co-Chair of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC) Steering Committee and has had the privilege to attend the annual Kennedy Center Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability (LEAD) conference for several years. Hillary has both presented and co-coordinated many CCAC Professional Development workshops geared around patron experience and customer service practices and has also co-presented a workshop centered around strategies for rental venue accessibility at the national LEAD conference in August of 2019.


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Recording Available Following Event

A recording will be shared on our Past Programs page a couple of weeks after the event. We’ll let registrants know when the video is live. The video will be captioned and audio described.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 217-840-5875 to request services. Thank you!

This session was planned by the Illinois Cultural Accessibility Network (ICAN), made possible through the funding of the Illinois Arts Council Agency (IACA) and the support of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC).

Adapting and Advancing: Cultural Accessibility During the Pandemic and Beyond-Day Two

Day 2: FUTURE | Cultural Accessibility After the Pandemic

Zoom Webinar Series
Thursday, April 29 3:00 PM Central/ 4:00 PM Eastern

Cost:FREE; $10.00 suggested donation to help offset the cost of program expenses

Living during a pandemic has transformed the way we present cultural programming – revealing both limitations and limitless opportunities. On Day 2 of this series, Museum, Arts and Culture Access Consortium (MAC) in New York and Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC) explore  how cultural organizations across the country are using lessons learned to create a more inclusive future.

Program will be approximately 90 minutes long. View the full line up of scheduled speakers.

Join us for one or both programs. Register for April 22nd’s program!

Due to our limited timing, we will not be facilitating a formal Q&A during this session. While we will aim to answer any questions submitted via the chat day-of, we encourage registrants to submit questions in advance via the prompts found on the registration path.


Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC and MAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure both organizations’ missions are achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations for these specific programs will be shared among both organizations and are tax deductible.

 

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, and individual donors like you.

This MAC Event has been made possible through funding from The New York Community Trust and The FAR Fund, and through the generous support of private donors.

Adapting and Advancing: Cultural Accessibility During the Pandemic and Beyond-Day One

Day 1: PRESENT | Being Creatively Accessible During a Pandemic

Zoom Webinar Series
Thursday, April 22 3:00 PM Central/ 4:00 PM Eastern

Cost:FREE; $10.00 suggested donation to help offset the cost of program expenses

Living during a pandemic has transformed the way we present cultural programming – revealing both limitations and limitless opportunities. On Day 1 of this 2-day series,  Museum, Arts and Culture Access Consortium (MAC) in New York and Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC) explore how cultural organizations have inventively adapted to incorporate accessibility into their work during the past year.

Program will be approximately 90 minutes long. View the full line up of scheduled speaker

Join us for one or both programs. Register for April 29th’s program!

Due to our limited timing, we will not be facilitating a formal Q&A during this session. While we will aim to answer any questions submitted via the chat day-of, we encourage registrants to submit questions in advance via the prompts found on the registration path.


Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests.

Suggested Donation

While CCAC and MAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure both organizations’ missions are achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations for these specific programs will be shared among both organizations and are tax deductible.

CCAC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, PERT Foundation, 21st Century Fox Social Impact, The Michael and Mona Heath Fund, Illinois Arts Council Agency through federal funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, and individual donors like you.

This MAC Event has been made possible through funding from The New York Community Trust and The FAR Fund, and through the generous support of private donors.

CCAC Lunch and Learn: Disability in Children’s Literature

Children’s literature is a critical tool in helping children to understand the world around them. One perspective often not captured in children’s literature, or captured ineffectively, is that of the disability experience. “As students look to the shelves in their classrooms and school libraries, they seek representations of themselves—characters who look, feel, and experience the world in similar ways.” (M. Kleekamp, 2019). Although diverse representation in children’s literature is an ongoing challenge to be addressed, we as consumers can take responsive action through a more mindful assessment of the books we choose to integrate into our professional work.

Join us for informal group discussion as we recap the ‘4 Guiding Questions’ presented in Monica Kleekamp’s piece: How To Critically Select Children’s Books With Representations of Disability Experiences (2019). We ask that all participants take a few minutes to read through Monica’s post in advance, and come with your thoughts!


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 715-212-9140 to request services. Thank you!

Suggested Donation

While CCAC programs are free, donations help to cover programming costs to ensure CCAC’s mission is achievable and accessible to all. You may donate online anytime! Donations to CCAC are tax deductible.

Ask About Access

We all want our programs, our spaces, and our online events to be accessible to as many folks as possible , but it’s easy to feel out of your depth, especially when you’re first starting to implement services such as captioning, sign language interpretation, or audio description into your programming. The first step? Questions, and lots of them! Here’s the time and space to ask accessibility providers and users where you can begin, what they recommend, and how to build a program or event that works for your guests.

Featuring Speakers:

Beth Finke, Author, Teacher, Journalist

Chuck Gruman, Accessibility Consultant

Susan Elizabeth Rangel, ASL Director, Teacher


Zoom Meeting Notes

Registered participants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link via email from this email account the day prior to the event. Please ensure that Info@ChicagoCulturalAccess.org is an approved sender to your email account, or be sure to check your Spam/Junk Mail filter for the email.

Accessibility

Real-Time Captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided. Please complete the accommodation request field found in the event registration path with what service(s) you will want to access, or for any additional requests. You may also reach us at 419-262-1886 to request services. Thank you!

This session was made possible through the funding of the Illinois Arts Council Agency (IACA) and the support of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC)

CCAC Lunch and Learn: Intro to CCAC Steering Committee

In this “Ask Me Anything” Lunch and Learn, join current members of the CCAC Steering Committee to delve into the responsibilities of the Consortium. The Steering Committee for CCAC is made up of volunteers from all walks of experience in cultural spaces, focused on the varying aspects of CCAC’s mission.  Learn more about the Steering Committee’s application process,  professional development planning, equipment loan program management, the access calendar, and other opportunities to engage!

If you or someone you know in the Chicagoland area is interested in being involved on a leadership level with CCAC, then this is a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more about what the expectations are. 2021 is a recruitment year for the Steering Committee, and we look forward to getting to know more passionate allies and advocates for cultural accessibility. Come with your thoughts, questions, and your lunch. We look forward to connecting!

Intro to Captioning

Captioning makes our art accessible to people who are deaf and hard of hearing. Open and Closed Captioning can be presented via a variety of platforms to offer a text translation of auditory elements such as dialogue, sound effects and music.

ADA 101: The ADA & Cultural Spaces

Join us for a brief ADA introduction geared towards beginners, especially focusing on how the law relates to cultural organizations like yours.

Disability Awareness Training for Front-Line Staff

Representatives from organizations of all scales are encouraged to join us for an interactive “train the trainer” workshop, which will include a panel of visitors with disabilities who discuss their own (non-scolding) positive and negative experiences in cultural spaces.

Guests Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

This workshop will offer a survey of services and programming that theaters, museums and other cultural institutions can provide to make themselves accessible for visitors who are blind or have low vision.

Guests Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Following the patron path, from outreach and initial point of contact through the visit’s conclusion, this workshop will offer a survey of services and programming that theaters, museums and other cultural institutions can provide to make themselves more accessible for visitors who are D/deaf or hard of hearing.

Visitors with Cognitive Disabilities

We will start with the basics: introducing you to this diverse audience that ranges from people on the autism spectrum, to adults with dementia, to visitors with Down syndrome. 

Forging Alliances

You don’t have to go it alone! Internal access committees and external advisory committees can help your organization, and support and further your accessibility initiatives.

The Elements of Outreach

In this workshop presenters will share practical outreach techniques that really work. Bring your organizational event brochures and flyers and brainstorm on effective outreach ideas through social media and other marketing strategies with workshop attendees.

Accessible Seating and Ticketing

Join us as we explore this topic and others to learn how the recent changes to ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) regulations impact your seating and ticketing policies.

 

Getting Started with Access

Join us to learn how you can make incremental improvements to ensure ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliance and a more inclusive and welcoming environment for visitors with disabilities.

 

Funding Accessibility

A panel of professionals share the basics of development and discuss the increasing attention funders are paying to accessibility.

Inclusive Programming for Children with Disabilities

Learn best practices for ensuring your programs are inclusive for the children with disabilities and their families who visit your cultural institution.

Getting Down to Business

Hear from cultural administrators in the midst of this process to learn about their successes, challenges, and how to move your own organization’s process forward.

Is Your Cultural Organization Prepared for An Emergency?

Hear from experienced emergency planners on best practices to address the needs of staff and visitors with disabilities in your emergency plan.  Experts will present their planning process and practical tips.

Creative Engagement in an Aging Society

Creative engagement programs invite elders to share their imagination – to help connect to and shape the world around them. Anne Basting will demonstrate how, rather than lamenting our aging audience and citizenry, we might build on strengths to create a more connected community as we age.

Sensory-Friendly Cultural Programming Summit

Visiting cultural organizations may be unsettling for visitors with sensory issues, including those on the Autism Spectrum and those with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). The bombardment of sensory information, a change in routine, and concern over others’ reactions to their unique needs and helpful tools can translate into a stressful–or even impossible–visit for people in the sensory community. 

Visual Language, Verbal Description and Multisensory Strategies

Through presentation, exercises and discussion, participants will explore the benefits of descriptive language for all audiences, learn the purpose of more thorough description for visitors who are blind or have low vision, and discuss strategies for developing and facilitating multisensory experiences.

Creating a staff training plan for access and inclusion

Learn how to create a low-cost, ongoing staff training plan for access and inclusion for all staff and volunteers.

LEAD Conference Share-Out: 60 Ideas in 60 Minutes

Gain key takeaways from your Chicago colleagues who attended the LEAD conference.

Web and Technology Access: Top Tips

We will discuss best practices for online and digital accessibility, highlight innovative apps currently in use, and share top tips for tech accessibility

Accessibility 101

This workshop will help you take the first steps toward creating a more inclusive experience at your organization.

Developing Accessible Museum Exhibitions

This workshop-style session will put the focus on exhibits, from space and flow, to interactives, to labels – and how to make them more accessible and inclusive.

Welcoming Veterans

Learn about some of the barriers that can prevent a Veteran from having an enjoyable experience.

Intro to Cultural Accessibility for Visitors with Disabilities

Is your organization thinking about ways to engage more inclusive practices for visitors with disabilities, but you’re not sure where to begin?

A Showcase of Accessible Services for Theater

Members of the creative, production, access and audience teams that performed “Project Potential” will discuss the fundamentals of each accessible service.

Serving Older Adults in Cultural Institutions

Hear from panelists representing cultural spaces and partner organizations about how they are better considering older adults in their programming and services so our older audience members can continue to participate in our cultural spaces as they age, maximizing independence and choice.

PANEL: Intro to Cultural Accessibility

Take the first (or second, third, or fourth!) steps toward creating a more inclusive experience at your organization, even if the pandemic has your organization working solely in virtual space.

Grant-funded organizations know we must be accessible to people with disabilities and older adults, though it may not always be clear how to do that if we don’t have the information or the tools. How do we get started? In what ways does the law impact our organization? What accessible accommodations are possible? How much will it cost? How can I get buy-in from my organization’s leadership? Join us for the expert guidance of Betty Siegel, Director of VSA and Accessibility for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C, and Tina Childress, educational audiologist, technology and social media aficionado, late-deafened adult and bilateral cochlear implant recipient from Champaign-Urbana, IL.

 

HOW DO I REGISTER? This event is part of the #OneState2020 conference. See the full conference lineup and register at onestate.artsalliance.org.

 

This session was planned by Illinois Cultural Accessibility Network (ICAN). ICAN is made possible through the funding of the Illinois Arts Council Agency (IACA) and the support of the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium (CCAC).

Accessible Outdoor Events

Get ready for summer in Chicago with this session devoted to providing accessible events outside!

New Year Access Resolutions

Plan practical strategies to meet your goals, and leave with a network of professionals to support your next steps—whether it’s starting anew or building out your existing accessible offerings.

Leading Accessible Virtual Programs

Successfully integrate accessibility, such as captioning, ASL interpreters, and audio description, into your next staff meeting or public program using the provided tools and strategies.